Ingested Foreign Bodies Removed by Flexible Endoscopy in Pediatric Patients: A 10-year Retrospective Study

Document Type: Original

Authors

1 Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ghaem Medical Center, Mashhad University of medical sciences, Mashhad, Iran

2 Department of Pediatrics, Ghaem Medical Center, Mashhad University of medical sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

3 Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ghaem Medical Center, Mashhad University of medical sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

4 ) Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Ghaem Medical Center, Mashhad University of medical sciences, Mashhad, Iran

5 Department of pediatric immunology, Ghaem medical center, Mashhad university science, Mashhad, Iran.

Abstract

Introduction: Determination of type and location of trapped objects and endoscopic observations among children with foreign-body ingestion.
Materials and Methods: We evaluated 105 endoscopic records of patients presenting with foreign-body ingestion from 2001–2011.
Results: Button batteries were the most common objects removed (41%). The lower segment of the esophagus was the most common trapping site. There was significant correlation between type of foreign body and its location of trapping. Abnormal endoscopic observations were reported in 33% patients. There was significant correlation between the type of foreign body and endoscopic observations. There was also a significant correlation between the location of the foreign body and endoscopic observation.
Conclusion: The pattern of foreign-body ingestion is somewhat different in our center compared with other studies. Awareness among parents about the prevention of this accident is an important step in decreasing the incidence of foreign-body ingestion.

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Main Subjects


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