Report of Common Aeroallergens among Allergic Patients in Northeastern Iran

Document Type: Original

Authors

1 Allergy Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

2 Inflamation and Inflammatory Disease Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

3 Addiction Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

Abstract

Introduction:
The prevalence of atopic diseases has increased in recent decades dramatically. The most common aeroallergens in Northeastern Iran have not been fully defined. Define the most common aeroallergens in allergic patients based on the skin prick test (SPT) was aimed in this investigation.
Materials and Methods:
This cross-sectional study enrolled 1,006 allergic patients (aged 1–86 years) from October 2010 to February 2014 referred to the Allergy clinics of Mashhad University of Medical Science. After completing a checklists including demographic information, the SPT was performed according to the patients’ history of aeroallergen sensitivity.
Results:
Patients with symptoms of asthma allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and urticaria were enrolled . 97% of patients had a positive skin test to at least one aeroallergen. The most prevalent allergens were Russian thistle (Salsola kali) (50.2%), ash (Fraxinus excelsior) (36.7%), grass mix (29.1%), tree mix (21.6%), and pigweed mix (19.5%). Common allergens in patients with different symptoms of allergic disorders were as follows: asthma (Russian thistle, grass mix, ash, tree mix, and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus); allergic rhinitis (Russian thistle,ash, grass mix, tree mix, and pigweed mix); urticaria (Russian thistle, ash, grass mix, pigweed mix, and tree mix) and atopic dermatitis (Russian thistle, grass mix, ash, tree mix, and pigweed mix). In the spring, the most prevalent allergens were Russian thistle, ash, grass mix, tree mix, and pigweed mix. In the summer, Russian thistle, ash, grass mix, tree mix, and pigweed mix accounted for the most prevalent allergens. During the autumn, Russian thistle, ash, grass mix, pigweed mix and lamb’s quarter were the most common aeroallergens, while in the winter, Russian thistle, ash, grass mix, pigweed mix, and tree mix were shown to be the most common aeroallergens.
Conclusion:
Determination of the most common aeroallergens in this area is unavoidable in the diagnosis and management of allergic disorders. Understanding the prevalence of the most common aeroallergens such as Russian thistle in 50.2% of people or other common aeroallergens can help patients and specialists to more easily identify suspected allergens, reduce costs, and support immunotherapy of allergic patients in this area. Moreover, it is helpful in avoiding pollens or cross-reactions.

Keywords

Main Subjects


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